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It’s going to be pants this Christmas

It's going to be PANTS this Christmas

Helping the homeless & vulnerable in Oxford this winter – It’s going to be PANTS this Christmas is the campaign for 2020. Building on the SOX APPEAL campaign from 2019, we are supporting The Gatehouse again this year, in even harder circumstances.

Started Christmas shopping? Buy an extra gift this year!

This year we would love PANTS as well as SOCKS. We would also welcome POTS of noodles, pasta or similar. Due to COVID clients are unable to access all centers and food and drink needs to be in takeaway containers.

It’s going to be PANTS this Christmas

The Gatehouse Oxford

Why help homeless at Christmas?

Homeless clients experience great discomfort from wet and damp shoes/socks. Their feet are often painful and are vulnerable to fungal infections, bacteria infections, trench foot and amputation. At Zest Podiatry where we are all podiatrists, we are very aware of the problems experienced and are keen to offer our help. It’s going to be PANTS this Christmas.

How Zest Podiatry help through the year

Throughout the year we provide free (organised through Forgotten Feet) podiatry care at The Gatehouse in St Giles Church. Ideally this would happen every 6 weeks where we see around 20 clients. After each podiatry treatment they are very appreciative of new socks that they can pop onto their newly treated feet. Covid has limited our help this year.

We need your help with It’s going to be PANTS this Christmas campaign

Please download the “It’s going to be pants this Christmas” marketing for your school or organisation and use the tag #pantsthischristmas.

Donations can we sent to us by post or dropped to our clinic, they need to be received by Friday 18th December. Please call us so we can arrange reception to let you in.

Trench foot – is this still a thing?

trench foot

Trench foot is a condition documented widely during the First and Second World Wars when soldiers had to endure months of exposure to wet and cold conditions in the trenches, affecting tens of thousands of troops.

Despite its history, this condition is still affecting many people today where they are exposed to wet, damp and cold conditions. Feet can become red initially but as the blood vessels constrict the skin becomes pale and wrinkled. This then causes the feet to swell and they can also become numb with feelings of heaviness, prickly or pain.

If left untreated, damage can occur to the tissues and nerves inside the foot with resultant blistering and ulceration of the skin. Worse still ulcers can turn into gangrene.

Who’s at risk?

Those people who are vulnerable and homeless. They are subjected to prolonged periods of time in cold, wet and damp conditions. They are very at risk of Trench Foot but it is not just isolated to the homeless or during winter months.

Sports competitors (runners,rowers, sailors, windsurfers) are susceptible to trench foot. Festival goers who spend wet weekend events knee high in mud are also pron to trench foot.

Management of trench foot

Managing trench foot is similar to dealing with frostbite. Where re-warming the feet gently and slowly is key- rapid rewarming can make the symptoms worse. Dressings blisters as part of wound care is important to prevent ulcers. It is worth noting that nerve damage and other symptoms may persist for many months afterwards. Podiatrists are trained in the management of trench foot.

How do you prevent it?

Prevention is always better than cure for trench foot.

Wearing clean, dry socks is key and having spares to change into is also a must . Putting sock liners into footwear can help draw moisture away from skin. 

Footwear should be removed frequently during the day and it is important that footwear is neither too tight or too loose. Like socks, footwear needs to be dry before wearing.

The feet should be clean and allowed to dry, with any excess sweating controlled by aluminium chloride products.

Massaging the feet can help promote circulation , and smoking is to be avoided as this restricts blood flow into the feet. 

Trench foot is not just a soldiers problem. Click here to read more about our winter homeless campaign with the gatehouse in Oxford assisting the collection of new socks.

Sox Appeal Oxford

Sox Appeal Oxford

Helping Homeless people keep warm this winter

Today we launch the SOX APPEAL campaign for the homeless in Oxford.

Did you hear us this morning on BBC Oxford radio? If not please listen to the clip below.

We are asking for donations of new socks, that we can give to the homeless of Oxford, through our partnership with Oxford The Gatehouse .

Homeless clients experience great discomfort from wet and damp shoes/socks. Their feet are often painful and are vulnerable to fungal infections, bacteria infections, trench foot and amputation. At Zest where we are all podiatrists, we are very aware of the problems experienced and are keen to offer our help.

Throughout the year we provide free (organised through Forgotten Feet) podiatry care at The Gatehouse in St Giles Church. This happens every 6 weeks where we see around 20 clients. After each podiatry treatment they are very appreciative of new socks that they can pop onto their newly treated feet.

Please download sox appeal oxford marketing for your school or organisation and use the tag #soxappealoxford.

Donations can we sent to us by post or dropped to our clinic, they need to be received by Friday 20th December.

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